News

¡Prodigio! Los talentos milagrosos están ayudando a cumplir con el desafío hispano

September 01, 2002

Es el año 1519. Un apuesto capitán de la baja nobleza Española sale orgulloso de su barco y marcha imperiosamente hacia la costa este de México, aclamando las tierras para España.

Su nombre es Hernán Cortez, y él ha llegado a la encrucijada de su corta y triste vida. Estremecido por la importancia de su desembarque, bautiza el lugar con el nombre de “Veracruz”.

Al pisar por primera vez estos suelos norteamericanos, cambió el mundo para siempre.

500 Años Después

Interaction

September 01, 2002

Getting the Bug

God brings people to us who need help (mentally, spiritually, and physically). We live on a secluded wilderness farm, 17 miles from tiny Talkeetna, Alaska, now bustling with activity as thousands of tourists from around the world pass through weekly.

Tomorrow we are taking our team of Belgiums and our stagecoach to town for the day to take children for rides—a promotion for reading from our local library. We will give away gospel magazines.

Christian Education It Takes a Team

August 01, 2002

Seventh-day Adventist Church leaders this month are turning their attention to a new school year, and they’re not alone.

Committees are meeting, and boards are busy caring for physical plants and the needs of faculty they supervise. Parents are strategizing how they can work out tuition costs. And teachers are getting ready for that first day of the new school year.

It’s a team effort of home, school, and Church. From youngest to oldest, everyone is—and should be—involved.

Our Lifeblood

Can you Swing it?

August 01, 2002

I remember when a quarter got you a gallon of gas. A buck scored you a gallon of ice cream. And $4,107.45 paid for a new 1964 Ford Galaxie 500XL (I have my grandpa’s old car parked in my garage—the sticker price still in the glovebox).

These days, a quarter may get you enough gas to mow a putting green; a buck will land you a cone at 31 Flavors (but don’t expect any ice cream); and for four grand, let’s just say your wheels won’t be the envy of everyone at school.

This month in history

August 01, 2002

The following events took place during the month of August:

1821

Missouri is admitted as the 24th state.

1894

The United States administration of Grover Cleveland recognizes the Republic of Hawaii.

1926

Gertrude Ederle of the United States becomes the first woman to swim the English Channel.

1936

Alaska Names New Treasurer, Superintendent of Schools

August 01, 2002 / Russ Johnson

Harold Dixon and John Kriegelstein have accepted the Alaska Conference Committee’s June 30 invitation to serve, respectively, as treasurer and superintendent of schools.

Merle Greenway, who served for many years as Alaska Conference treasurer, superintendent of schools, and youth camp overseer, has moved to the East Coast to serve as superintendent of schools in the Southern New England Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

Gem State Adventist Academy Welcomes New Vice Principal

August 01, 2002 / Linda Klinger

Gem State Adventist Academy (GSAA) has announced the appointment of Don Perkins as its new vice principal for finance. Perkins has served academies for 24 years, as boys’ dean, business manager, vice principal, and principal.

His mother, a teacher for 35 years, taught him the value of quality education, and after he graduated from Cedar Lake Academy, Perkins earned a degree in business from Walla Walla College. He then went on to receive a master’s degree in school administration at East Stroudsburg University.

Mt. Ellis Seniors Top off Mission Project

August 01, 2002 / Ray Cummings

Mt. Ellis Academy’s (MEA’s) yearly alumni reunion brings many former students back to campus, where they revel in renewed friendships, clean air, and mountain scenery.

They also eagerly trek across campus to locate “their” class gifts, read the accompanying plaques, and reassure themselves that their classes did, indeed, leave noteworthy legacies.

This year’s graduating class spent many meetings discussing how they, too, might leave a memorial that MEA students would appreciate for years to come.