Blessings Come in Whispers at WWVA

The biggest blessings often come in the form of whispers, rather than yells.

Five years ago, the parking lot of Walla Walla Valley Academy (WWVA) was deemed unsafe. For years, cars backed out of the front lot directly into traffic. Once a remote and lazy road west of College Place, Wash., Academy Way had become increasingly busy with the addition of Rogers Adventist School next door and continued housing development nearby.

After nearly 50 years in this location, the time had come to refresh and update our campus — and we dipped a toe in with a new parking lot with the investment of donors committed to Seventh-day Adventist education.

In the past five years — spurred on by the functional yet beautiful new parking lot — alumni, community, students, families, faculty and donors have pulled together to tackle project after project. Contributions included financial gifts, which facilitated the updates to our auditorium, main foyers, gym, dining hall, bathrooms and lodge. Gifts of time created a beautiful new baseball diamond for our fledging team.

Our facility looks fresh, bright and modern, with spaces developed for the way students learn today. It has clearly impacted learning and academic pursuits. But the biggest impact has been on the connection students have with each other and the community. The refreshed spaces provide places for them to learn together, meet with their community and walk with Christ.

“We are seeing the impact of students feeling supported and valued,” says Amy Underhill, WWVA alumni and development director. “They can see how many people believe in them and are working for them to have opportunities. It inspires them to work hard. The impact on individual lives goes way beyond what can be measured.”

There are still projects to tackle, improvements to make and students to invest in. WWVA is committed to empowering students for Christ. We are grateful for the many whispers of support invested in this next generation to fulfill that mission. What a blessing this quiet conversation has been and will continue to be.

February 02, 2017 / Upper Columbia Conference
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