Ritzville Company Takes a Look Into the Past To Celebrate Heritage Sabbath

Ritzville Company Takes a Look Into the Past To Celebrate Heritage Sabbath Members of the Ritzville Company recently celebrated Heritage Sabbath as a remembrance of when and how the Seventh-day Adventist Church began. Donning vintage clothing, the members enjoyed listening to Doug Pond, their pastor, deliver the sermon dressed as one of the founding fathers, James White. Pond even wore a beard to look more like the James White of the 1860s. Old photos provided inspiration for the costumes worn by the members. The church was also decorated to depict the period with crocheted doilies and handmade quilts. Member Sandy Bowman brought her antique family Bible in which was recorded the marriage of her ancestors, Henry Crittenden and Elizabeth Miles, on Oct. 21, 1844. The Bible, which originally came in a five-volume set, was published in 1815. The volumes were distributed among family members long ago. With the aid of hurricane lamps for light, the group sang songs from 100-year-old hymnals. A pump organ provided the music for singing. Some members said stepping back into the past was enlightening, and there's talk of making the celebration an annual event.

Ritzville Company Takes a Look Into the Past

To Celebrate Heritage Sabbath

Members of the Ritzville Company recently celebrated Heritage Sabbath as a remembrance of when and how the Seventh-day Adventist Church began. Donning vintage clothing, the members enjoyed listening to Doug Pond, their pastor, deliver the sermon dressed as one of the founding fathers, James White. Pond even wore a beard to look more like the James White of the 1860s.

Old photos provided inspiration for the costumes worn by the members. The church was also decorated to depict the period with crocheted doilies and handmade quilts. Member Sandy Bowman brought her antique family Bible in which was recorded the marriage of her ancestors, Henry Crittenden and Elizabeth Miles, on Oct. 21, 1844. The Bible, which originally came in a five-volume set, was published in 1815. The volumes were distributed among family members long ago.

With the aid of hurricane lamps for light, the group sang songs from 100-year-old hymnals. A pump organ provided the music for singing.

Some members said stepping back into the past was enlightening, and there's talk of making the celebration an annual event.

January 01, 2007 / Upper Columbia Conference
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