Milo’s Cornerstone Industry Thunderbird Wood Products Offers Jobs for Students

Milo’s Cornerstone Industry Thunderbird Wood Products Offers Jobs for Students On the campus of Milo Adventist Academy, just over the hill from the cafeteria, sits a long building. This is Thunderbird Wood Products, part of the Milo campus since 1974. At that time, it was Thunderbird Furniture, with the home office located at Thunderbird Academy in Ariz. In 2001, the Oregon Conference purchased the plant and changed the name to Thunderbird Wood Products. Thunderbird and Milo have enjoyed a mutually beneficial relationship for more than 30 years. Milo is able to supply a workforce to supplement the 30 full-time employees, and Thunderbird provides training and work for the students as well as supplying the sawdust that heats the campus during the winter months. Milo is one of the only academies left with a conference-owned industry that provides jobs for the students. Mark Starr, manager, emphasizes that industries are an integral part of our schools. Students can start working there at age 16 for minimum wage, but are eligible for bonuses and wage increases, especially when they work over the summer months. One of those students is Andy Jones, a junior from Turner, Oregon. He says, working here "teaches you life skills for the future.” Thunderbird is growing. Traditionally, it has specialized in alder components for cabinets and furniture, but management is looking to expand its line and customer base. They are also in the process of expanding their space to accommodate the new lines. Starr is excited about the potential for growth and is looking forward to leading the company in the future.

Milo’s Cornerstone Industry

Thunderbird Wood Products Offers Jobs for Students

On the campus of Milo Adventist Academy, just over the hill from the cafeteria, sits a long building. This is Thunderbird Wood Products, part of the Milo campus since 1974. At that time, it was Thunderbird Furniture, with the home office located at Thunderbird Academy in Ariz. In 2001, the Oregon Conference purchased the plant and changed the name to Thunderbird Wood Products.

Thunderbird and Milo have enjoyed a mutually beneficial relationship for more than 30 years. Milo is able to supply a workforce to supplement the 30 full-time employees, and Thunderbird provides training and work for the students as well as supplying the sawdust that heats the campus during the winter months.

Milo is one of the only academies left with a conference-owned industry that provides jobs for the students. Mark Starr, manager, emphasizes that industries are an integral part of our schools. Students can start working there at age 16 for minimum wage, but are eligible for bonuses and wage increases, especially when they work over the summer months. One of those students is Andy Jones, a junior from Turner, Oregon. He says, working here "teaches you life skills for the future.”

Thunderbird is growing. Traditionally, it has specialized in alder components for cabinets and furniture, but management is looking to expand its line and customer base. They are also in the process of expanding their space to accommodate the new lines. Starr is excited about the potential for growth and is looking forward to leading the company in the future.

December 01, 2006 / Oregon Conference
Share