Arthur Lickey: 1921–2006

Arthur Lickey: 1921–2006 Arthur R. Lickey was the North Pacific Union Conference Public Affairs and Religious Liberty (PARL) director 1973–86. He died June 1, 2006. He was tall. Lanky. He wore big shoes. And he was fearless. One of Lickey's roles as North Pacific Union Conference Public Affairs and Religious Liberty department director required him to be in contact with both employers and labor leaders. The contacts were frequently confrontational. Hostile bosses were not about to brook interference with the way they did their jobs. But Lickey was fearless, determined, and at the same time, consistently cordial—even in the face of those ready to get in his face. When an Adventist—or any person, for that matter—called Lickey for help with religious discrimination in the workplace, he helped—then and there. He presented the case for reasonable accommodation to employers and conscientious exemption to labor chiefs. More often than not, he prevailed. Lickey's other main PARL role involved the legislative assemblies of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. He and then-associate Glenn Patterson set up a network of pastors in each capital city to spot bad bills and support good ones. When the assemblies were not in session, Lickey hit the road to visit the legislators in their homes and offices, on their farms and ranches. They perceived him as a personal friend, not some pushy lobbyist. They knew him to be a minister committed to the principle that religious freedom is for everyone.

Arthur Lickey: 1921–2006

Arthur R. Lickey was the North Pacific Union Conference Public Affairs and Religious Liberty (PARL) director 1973–86. He died June 1, 2006.

He was tall. Lanky. He wore big shoes. And he was fearless.

One of Lickey's roles as North Pacific Union Conference Public Affairs and Religious Liberty department director required him to be in contact with both employers and labor leaders. The contacts were frequently confrontational. Hostile bosses were not about to brook interference with the way they did their jobs. But Lickey was fearless, determined, and at the same time, consistently cordial—even in the face of those ready to get in his face.

When an Adventist—or any person, for that matter—called Lickey for help with religious discrimination in the workplace, he helped—then and there. He presented the case for reasonable accommodation to employers and conscientious exemption to labor chiefs. More often than not, he prevailed.

Lickey's other main PARL role involved the legislative assemblies of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. He and then-associate Glenn Patterson set up a network of pastors in each capital city to spot bad bills and support good ones. When the assemblies were not in session, Lickey hit the road to visit the legislators in their homes and offices, on their farms and ranches. They perceived him as a personal friend, not some pushy lobbyist. They knew him to be a minister committed to the principle that religious freedom is for everyone.

September 01, 2006 / North Pacific Union
Share