Adventists Participate in VegFest

Adventists Participate in VegFest Vegetarian food was the spotlight of VegFest 2006 in the Seattle Center on March 11 and 12. Although Adventists are the pioneers of vegetarianism in North America, other vegetarian organizations and movements have been rather devoid of them—until now. Vegetarians of Washington, with its membership of more than 3,000, is growing in popularity among Adventists, and many could be found among the 11,000 attendees at the fifth annual vegetarian food festival. “I do feel regret that we have dropped the ball to some extent compared to the positive impact we could have had,” said Mike Orlich, a doctor from the Weimar Institute who presented at the festival. “When I look at who has really gotten the word out about vegetarianism, I think it could have been us more.” The VegFest gave Adventists a chance to do just that. Orlich and Keith Hanson, a doctor who runs the CHIP program at the Brewster (Wash.) Church, gave one-hour presentations on the health benefits of a vegetarian diet. VegFest 2006 provided an opportunity for health and faith groups to come together for a common cause. Adventist businesses, including Butler Foods, Alder Siesta, Silver Hills Bakery and the Washington Adventist Book Center, distributed food samples. The Tacoma Southside Church provided free health screenings, and other Adventists served as volunteers for the festival or simply attended to taste and learn. Vegetarians of Washington began as an informational and educational initiative in 2001. Stewart Rose, one of the founders and a vegan, formed the group after being treated in a cardiac ward of a Puget Sound hospital where he was warned to reduce his cholesterol and then was presented with hospital fare high in calories. Rose's experience galvanized him to raise awareness of vegetarianism in the state. As an Orthodox Jew, Rose also wanted to acknowledge the faith component that motivates many vegetarians. Tacoma Southside volunteer Tara Marie Cardenas recalls how a woman talked with her and thanked her church for participating. For this woman, VegFest 2006 answered her question, "Where are the Christians uniting health and spirituality?”

Adventists Participate in VegFest

Vegetarian food was the spotlight of VegFest 2006 in the Seattle Center on March 11 and 12.

Although Adventists are the pioneers of vegetarianism in North America, other vegetarian organizations and movements have been rather devoid of them—until now.

Vegetarians of Washington, with its membership of more than 3,000, is growing in popularity among Adventists, and many could be found among the 11,000 attendees at the fifth annual vegetarian food festival.

“I do feel regret that we have dropped the ball to some extent compared to the positive impact we could have had,” said Mike Orlich, a doctor from the Weimar Institute who presented at the festival. “When I look at who has really gotten the word out about vegetarianism, I think it could have been us more.”

The VegFest gave Adventists a chance to do just that. Orlich and Keith Hanson, a doctor who runs the CHIP program at the Brewster (Wash.) Church, gave one-hour presentations on the health benefits of a vegetarian diet.

VegFest 2006 provided an opportunity for health and faith groups to come together for a common cause. Adventist businesses, including Butler Foods, Alder Siesta, Silver Hills Bakery and the Washington Adventist Book Center, distributed food samples. The Tacoma Southside Church provided free health screenings, and other Adventists served as volunteers for the festival or simply attended to taste and learn.

Vegetarians of Washington began as an informational and educational initiative in 2001. Stewart Rose, one of the founders and a vegan, formed the group after being treated in a cardiac ward of a Puget Sound hospital where he was warned to reduce his cholesterol and then was presented with hospital fare high in calories.

Rose's experience galvanized him to raise awareness of vegetarianism in the state. As an Orthodox Jew, Rose also wanted to acknowledge the faith component that motivates many vegetarians.

Tacoma Southside volunteer Tara Marie Cardenas recalls how a woman talked with her and thanked her church for participating. For this woman, VegFest 2006 answered her question, "Where are the Christians uniting health and spirituality?”

May 01, 2006 / Washington Conference
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