A Heart for Aleknagik's Kids

A Heart for Aleknagik's Kids Ken and Debbie Reiswig have a heart for the kids in Aleknagik, Alaska. This summer they worked with local Adventist members Roland and Beverly Moody and their pastor to organize two different Vacation Bible Schools and keep in contact with those kids throughout the year. A Baptist group visited from Texas and presented a week of activities for the kids. They also supplied the Reiswigs with a bunch of little toys, which they put with some books for the adults to make Christmas bags that they delivered to each child that had attended VBS last summer. The road from town ends on the other side of Lake Aleknagik from the Aleknagik Adventist Church. So, each Sabbath, Ken fires up the snowmobile and pulls a sled filled with kids across the frozen lake to the church. Sometimes the sled is so full that one kid will be riding the rails behind the sled. Before the lake is safely frozen to allow sledding across, Ken lets the kids practice their rowing as they cross the open water in his boat. When the wind is blowing, the crossing can be a frigid challenge, especially when more than one trip is required.

A Heart for Aleknagik's Kids

Ken and Debbie Reiswig have a heart for the kids in Aleknagik, Alaska. This summer they worked with local Adventist members Roland and Beverly Moody and their pastor to organize two different Vacation Bible Schools and keep in contact with those kids throughout the year. A Baptist group visited from Texas and presented a week of activities for the kids. They also supplied the Reiswigs with a bunch of little toys, which they put with some books for the adults to make Christmas bags that they delivered to each child that had attended VBS last summer.

The road from town ends on the other side of Lake Aleknagik from the Aleknagik Adventist Church. So, each Sabbath, Ken fires up the snowmobile and pulls a sled filled with kids across the frozen lake to the church. Sometimes the sled is so full that one kid will be riding the rails behind the sled. Before the lake is safely frozen to allow sledding across, Ken lets the kids practice their rowing as they cross the open water in his boat. When the wind is blowing, the crossing can be a frigid challenge, especially when more than one trip is required.

April 01, 2006 / Alaska Conference
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