Revival at Milo A Challenging Week of Prayer Inspires Commitment

Revival at Milo A Challenging Week of Prayer Inspires Commitment Never has a week of prayer at Milo been so talked about, so challenging. Debates arose as students analyzed the speaker’s words. Friends carried on discussions in class, in their rooms, and in the cafeteria. What could the speaker, Clarissa Worley, have said to evoke this much interest? Worley, then Beaverton Church associate pastor, began the week by distinguishing between love and trust. Love, in her words, is bestowing tangible acts of favor on someone. Trust, on the other hand, is opening oneself up to receive acts of favor. “Love everyone,” Worley proclaimed, “but be careful who you trust.” She drew this concept from the message of Proverbs 4:23, “Above all else, guard your heart, for it is the wellspring of life.” Christians should not put their trust in humans, but instead trust God working in them. Throughout the week, Worley and her team, which consisted of her sister, Darschelle Worley, and friends Adele Wheeldon and Kondi Kulisewa, covered topics that ranged from physical purity to overcoming sin. Some students knew they needed to change, but lacked the motivation. After listening to the experiences of the speakers, many decided to take the steps toward personal reformation. The Friday night communion service was the highlight of the week. Students demonstrated their acceptance of God’s forgiveness by coming forward and taking the emblems of Christ’s sacrifice for themselves. Then everyone was invited to share their testimonies. A vespers service that normally would have ended by 9:30 p.m. voluntarily lasted until almost 1 a.m. While many tears were shed, it was not a sad event. Students cried from the realization of God’s grace and from the joy of the family-like atmosphere that filled the church. The spiritual high brought many students gratefully to their knees. And Milo students have vowed not to let go of that experience.

Revival at Milo

A Challenging Week of Prayer Inspires Commitment

Never has a week of prayer at Milo been so talked about, so challenging. Debates arose as students analyzed the speaker’s words. Friends carried on discussions in class, in their rooms, and in the cafeteria. What could the speaker, Clarissa Worley, have said to evoke this much interest?

Worley, then Beaverton Church associate pastor, began the week by distinguishing between love and trust. Love, in her words, is bestowing tangible acts of favor on someone. Trust, on the other hand, is opening oneself up to receive acts of favor. “Love everyone,” Worley proclaimed, “but be careful who you trust.” She drew this concept from the message of Proverbs 4:23, “Above all else, guard your heart, for it is the wellspring of life.” Christians should not put their trust in humans, but instead trust God working in them.

Throughout the week, Worley and her team, which consisted of her sister, Darschelle Worley, and friends Adele Wheeldon and Kondi Kulisewa, covered topics that ranged from physical purity to overcoming sin. Some students knew they needed to change, but lacked the motivation. After listening to the experiences of the speakers, many decided to take the steps toward personal reformation.

The Friday night communion service was the highlight of the week. Students demonstrated their acceptance of God’s forgiveness by coming forward and taking the emblems of Christ’s sacrifice for themselves. Then everyone was invited to share their testimonies.

A vespers service that normally would have ended by 9:30 p.m. voluntarily lasted until almost 1 a.m. While many tears were shed, it was not a sad event. Students cried from the realization of God’s grace and from the joy of the family-like atmosphere that filled the church.

The spiritual high brought many students gratefully to their knees. And Milo students have vowed not to let go of that experience.

December 01, 2005 / Oregon Conference
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Katie Currier and Brenda Beenken, Milo seniors