Livingstone Student’s Poster Wins NAD Health Poster Contest

Livingstone Student’s Poster Wins NAD Health Poster Contest Jim Mayne, a junior at Livingstone Adventist Academy in Salem, Ore., takes health to heart. “Physical health is important to me,” says Mayne, who can often be found playing his favorite sport, baseball. Mayne’s interest in health became a winning formula in June when he won the 2005 North American Division’s health poster contest. Mayne, then a sophomore at Livingstone, created the poster in May as a project for his health class. His poster design, drawn in ink and colored pencil, features several facets of physical health balancing on a scale. On one side is a mound of fruits and vegetables, showing good nutrition. On the other side is the element of physical exercise, symbolized by a baseball player. Mayne, who is from McMinnville, Ore., and attends the Newberg Church, says he was not expecting the news when he heard that he had won the contest. “I was pretty happy and surprised,” says Mayne. “After I entered, I’d pretty much forgotten about it.” Less surprised, though, was Mayne’s teacher, Chris Sequeira, who gave him the assignment. “I knew he could do it,” said Sequeira, Livingstone’s math and health teacher. “This is especially impressive since he didn’t have an art teacher last year.”

Livingstone Student’s Poster

Wins NAD Health Poster Contest

Jim Mayne, a junior at Livingstone Adventist Academy in Salem, Ore., takes health to heart. “Physical health is important to me,” says Mayne, who can often be found playing his favorite sport, baseball. Mayne’s interest in health became a winning formula in June when he won the 2005 North American Division’s health poster contest.

Mayne, then a sophomore at Livingstone, created the poster in May as a project for his health class. His poster design, drawn in ink and colored pencil, features several facets of physical health balancing on a scale. On one side is a mound of fruits and vegetables, showing good nutrition. On the other side is the element of physical exercise, symbolized by a baseball player.

Mayne, who is from McMinnville, Ore., and attends the Newberg Church, says he was not expecting the news when he heard that he had won the contest. “I was pretty happy and surprised,” says Mayne. “After I entered, I’d pretty much forgotten about it.”

Less surprised, though, was Mayne’s teacher, Chris Sequeira, who gave him the assignment. “I knew he could do it,” said Sequeira, Livingstone’s math and health teacher. “This is especially impressive since he didn’t have an art teacher last year.”

November 01, 2005 / Oregon Conference
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