Engineering Professor Awarded Second Fulbright Scholar Grant

Engineering Professor Awarded Second Fulbright Scholar Grant Bryce E. Cole, associate professor of engineering at Walla Walla College, will spend six months in Europe this year, thanks to a Fulbright Scholar travel grant. Cole will teach fluid mechanics and groundwater hydrology at the University for Applied Arts and Sciences at Hildesheim, Germany. Cole will also travel to Russia to collaborate on the implementation of a computer simulation of flood control measures. “I’m a bit excited about the project. I’m afraid my Russian is limited to what I have read in the Eloise Goes to Moscow book I read to my kids, though,” says Cole. The computer simulation will be a game that shows how changes in land use, such as putting in dams, can increase or decrease flood damage and repair costs. Cole earned a bachelor of arts and a bachelor of science in engineering from WWC in 1987, a master of science in civil engineering from the University of Massachusetts in 1989, and a doctoral degree from the University of Notre Dame in 1996. He was also the recipient of a student Fulbright grant while a doctoral candidate, and spent a year studying in Brunswick, Germany. Cole has taught at WWC in the Edward F. Cross School of Engineering since 1995. Cole teaches civil engineering classes at the school, which enrolls approximately 200 students in its civil, computer, electrical, mechanical, and bioengineering programs. The research Cole conducts at WWC examines using temperature to relate how groundwater and surface water interact, usually involving how streams lose or gain water through groundwater. He has also conducted research on ways to increase student comprehension and interest, which led to his computer simulation project.

Engineering Professor

Awarded Second Fulbright Scholar Grant

Bryce E. Cole, associate professor of engineering at Walla Walla College, will spend six months in Europe this year, thanks to a Fulbright Scholar travel grant. Cole will teach fluid mechanics and groundwater hydrology at the University for Applied Arts and Sciences at Hildesheim, Germany. Cole will also travel to Russia to collaborate on the implementation of a computer simulation of flood control measures.

“I’m a bit excited about the project. I’m afraid my Russian is limited to what I have read in the Eloise Goes to Moscow book I read to my kids, though,” says Cole.

The computer simulation will be a game that shows how changes in land use, such as putting in dams, can increase or decrease flood damage and repair costs. Cole earned a bachelor of arts and a bachelor of science in engineering from WWC in 1987, a master of science in civil engineering from the University of Massachusetts in 1989, and a doctoral degree from the University of Notre Dame in 1996. He was also the recipient of a student Fulbright grant while a doctoral candidate, and spent a year studying in Brunswick, Germany.

Cole has taught at WWC in the Edward F. Cross School of Engineering since 1995. Cole teaches civil engineering classes at the school, which enrolls approximately 200 students in its civil, computer, electrical, mechanical, and bioengineering programs. The research Cole conducts at WWC examines using temperature to relate how groundwater and surface water interact, usually involving how streams lose or gain water through groundwater. He has also conducted research on ways to increase student comprehension and interest, which led to his computer simulation project.

March 01, 2005 / Walla Walla University
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