UCA's Technology Lab Gets Updated For Today's Students

UCA's Technology Lab Gets Updated For Today's Students Thanks to the continuing generosity of future-minded alumni and several private foundations, Upper Columbia Academy’s technology department has recently undergone some dramatic changes. In addition to remodeling the technology classroom, the school was able to develop a state-of-the-art technology lab, installing eleven specialized work stations with sixteen new computers. Two additional computers were placed in other areas of the department. Previously, the department had had only a make-shift lab with a handful of fourth generation computers. Each of the eleven new stations features at least one of the flat-screen computers, selected for their ability to run the latest in technology programs. The computers offer specialized learning modules which take students through a somewhat self-paced tutorial program under the teacher's supervision. With each topic taking approximately three weeks to complete, every student will be able to choose at least six areas to complete during a semester. Two students can work simultaneously at each station. While the department has been able to offer computer-aided drafting for some time, they are now able to offer training in eleven additional areas of technology: 1. Desktop publishing, 2. Structural engineering and design, 3. Industrial pneumatics, 4. Computer-aided drafting, 5. Forensic science, 6. Digital photography, 7. Home design, 8. Digital electronics, 9. Robotics, 10. Drafting and 11. Hydraulics The technology building’s classroom is utilized for the classtime portion of courses such as welding, woodworking, exploring tech, basic car care, auto CAD (computer aided design), and photography and fabrication technology. The brick walls were insulated and sheetrocked, the ceiling dropped and insulated, and the electrical wiring replaced and updated. In addition, new windows, new carpet and a new heating/air conditioning unit were installed. “The difference in the atmosphere of the new classroom is just amazing!” says grateful technology teacher Chuck Paulson. “The students have a whole new sense of pride in the department and a much higher level of respect for technology as an academic discipline when they see what’s been done here. But the real thrill is to see them using all of this new technology and getting excited about it. They get a vision for how it might be part of their own future.”

UCA's Technology Lab Gets Updated

For Today's Students

Thanks to the continuing generosity of future-minded alumni and several private foundations, Upper Columbia Academy’s technology department has recently undergone some dramatic changes. In addition to remodeling the technology classroom, the school was able to develop a state-of-the-art technology lab, installing eleven specialized work stations with sixteen new computers. Two additional computers were placed in other areas of the department. Previously, the department had had only a make-shift lab with a handful of fourth generation computers.

Each of the eleven new stations features at least one of the flat-screen computers, selected for their ability to run the latest in technology programs. The computers offer specialized learning modules which take students through a somewhat self-paced tutorial program under the teacher's supervision. With each topic taking approximately three weeks to complete, every student will be able to choose at least six areas to complete during a semester. Two students can work simultaneously at each station. While the department has been able to offer computer-aided drafting for some time, they are now able to offer training in eleven additional areas of technology: 1. Desktop publishing, 2. Structural engineering and design, 3. Industrial pneumatics, 4. Computer-aided drafting, 5. Forensic science, 6. Digital photography, 7. Home design, 8. Digital electronics, 9. Robotics, 10. Drafting and 11. Hydraulics

The technology building’s classroom is utilized for the classtime portion of courses such as welding, woodworking, exploring tech, basic car care, auto CAD (computer aided design), and photography and fabrication technology. The brick walls were insulated and sheetrocked, the ceiling dropped and insulated, and the electrical wiring replaced and updated. In addition, new windows, new carpet and a new heating/air conditioning unit were installed.

“The difference in the atmosphere of the new classroom is just amazing!” says grateful technology teacher Chuck Paulson. “The students have a whole new sense of pride in the department and a much higher level of respect for technology as an academic discipline when they see what’s been done here. But the real thrill is to see them using all of this new technology and getting excited about it. They get a vision for how it might be part of their own future.”

December 01, 2004 / Upper Columbia Conference
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