Sequim Churches Pull Together to Benefit Dying Member

"It is through the social relations that Christianity comes in contact with the world.” —Ellen G. White The Richmond family, members of the Sequim (Wash.) Church, received the kind of news on Oct. 23 that no one wants to hear—Ken Richmond, 43, had brain cancer. For his wife, Jay, and daughters, Cynthia, 9, and Heather, 7, their lives would never be the same. Before one emergency procedure, Jay was told Ken would likely be paralyzed—if he lived at all. God spared Ken’s life and gave him the strength and balance to walk for weeks afterward. Ken prayed to see Cynthia’s 10th birthday and to spend one more Christmas with his family, and God said yes. Meanwhile, a vision of a silent auction to benefit the Richmonds popped into the head of another Sequim member, as if God had planned the entire event and was now showing it to her. And she said yes. Members of other community churches helped by distributing flyers, creating a dollar-matching program and loaning their facilities for the event. More than 45 businesses and organizations donated items for the auction, and a local newspaper reporter wrote a full story about this community coming together to benefit this family. The small community of Sequim raised thousands of dollars for the Richmonds. Ken slipped into the waiting arms of Jesus on March 1 to await the resurrection morning. And, like the special silent auction held for his family, his memorial service included many people from his community.

"It is through the social relations that Christianity comes in contact with the world.” —Ellen G. White

The Richmond family, members of the Sequim (Wash.) Church, received the kind of news on Oct. 23 that no one wants to hear—Ken Richmond, 43, had brain cancer. For his wife, Jay, and daughters, Cynthia, 9, and Heather, 7, their lives would never be the same.

Before one emergency procedure, Jay was told Ken would likely be paralyzed—if he lived at all. God spared Ken’s life and gave him the strength and balance to walk for weeks afterward. Ken prayed to see Cynthia’s 10th birthday and to spend one more Christmas with his family, and God said yes.

Meanwhile, a vision of a silent auction to benefit the Richmonds popped into the head of another Sequim member, as if God had planned the entire event and was now showing it to her. And she said yes.

Members of other community churches helped by distributing flyers, creating a dollar-matching program and loaning their facilities for the event. More than 45 businesses and organizations donated items for the auction, and a local newspaper reporter wrote a full story about this community coming together to benefit this family. The small community of Sequim raised thousands of dollars for the Richmonds.

Ken slipped into the waiting arms of Jesus on March 1 to await the resurrection morning. And, like the special silent auction held for his family, his memorial service included many people from his community.

May 01, 2004 / Washington Conference
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