Milton Family Life Series Inspires Youth

Milton Family Life Series Inspires Youth "How can we make the most positive impact on families in our community?” we asked at the first meeting of our new family life committee at the Milton-Freewater (Ore.) Church. Our discussion revealed a common conviction: we wanted to help young teens and pre-teens form healthy relationships. Our concerns were founded on reports of record numbers of unwed teenage mothers in our town, on media pleas for an end of bullying and fear in neighborhood schools, and on testimony from the younger members of our committee that Adventist kids needed help with relationships, too. “If we can teach young people to build relationships on solid, godly principles,” we reasoned, “we will effect positive change in families of the future.” So we asked Karrlayne Beck, counselor at Rogers Elementary School in College Place, Wash., and Joe Galusha, animal behavior specialist and Walla Walla College professor, to facilitate five Friday evening classes. Beck’s topics were “The Power of Respect,” “Bullying and Teasing” and “Anger Management.” Galusha presented his two-part series entitled “Dating, Mating and Relating.” We decided to time our series to coincide with evangelistic meetings our pastors were holding for community adults. Our target audience included young people from 10 to 14. We sent invitations to recent Vacation Bible School attendees in that age group. Articles in the local newspaper, fliers and posters, and personal invitations to friends and neighbors rounded out our publicity. We were pleased to have 40 very enthusiastic young people attend. Rachel and Charlie Coleman helped us usher in the Sabbath with contemporary worship songs. Fun icebreakers, bushels of snacks and gallons of icy juice added to the festive atmosphere. The young people seemed hungry to learn about this topic that so vitally affects their lives. Drawing from extensive experience as teachers and a vast knowledge of both human and animal behavior, Beck and Galusha kept the group totally involved. Well-done videos helped the young people to make personal application of principles they were learning. Success was evident as we heard attending young people discussing with family and friends what they had learned. As one young man left Galusha’s first lecture, he told his mother, “I have to go right home and call [my girlfriend]. Please don’t interrupt me because I’ll be on the telephone a long time. We’re going to have to spend a long time talking this over.” Wow! What could be a greater reward?

Milton Family Life Series Inspires Youth

"How can we make the most positive impact on families in our community?” we asked at the first meeting of our new family life committee at the Milton-Freewater (Ore.) Church. Our discussion revealed a common conviction: we wanted to help young teens and pre-teens form healthy relationships. Our concerns were founded on reports of record numbers of unwed teenage mothers in our town, on media pleas for an end of bullying and fear in neighborhood schools, and on testimony from the younger members of our committee that Adventist kids needed help with relationships, too. “If we can teach young people to build relationships on solid, godly principles,” we reasoned, “we will effect positive change in families of the future.”

So we asked Karrlayne Beck, counselor at Rogers Elementary School in College Place, Wash., and Joe Galusha, animal behavior specialist and Walla Walla College professor, to facilitate five Friday evening classes. Beck’s topics were “The Power of Respect,” “Bullying and Teasing” and “Anger Management.” Galusha presented his two-part series entitled “Dating, Mating and Relating.” We decided to time our series to coincide with evangelistic meetings our pastors were holding for community adults.

Our target audience included young people from 10 to 14. We sent invitations to recent Vacation Bible School attendees in that age group. Articles in the local newspaper, fliers and posters, and personal invitations to friends and neighbors rounded out our publicity. We were pleased to have 40 very enthusiastic young people attend.

Rachel and Charlie Coleman helped us usher in the Sabbath with contemporary worship songs. Fun icebreakers, bushels of snacks and gallons of icy juice added to the festive atmosphere. The young people seemed hungry to learn about this topic that so vitally affects their lives. Drawing from extensive experience as teachers and a vast knowledge of both human and animal behavior, Beck and Galusha kept the group totally involved. Well-done videos helped the young people to make personal application of principles they were learning.

Success was evident as we heard attending young people discussing with family and friends what they had learned. As one young man left Galusha’s first lecture, he told his mother, “I have to go right home and call [my girlfriend]. Please don’t interrupt me because I’ll be on the telephone a long time. We’re going to have to spend a long time talking this over.” Wow! What could be a greater reward?

February 01, 2004 / Upper Columbia Conference
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